Disruption by Design

If we are to expect that the fields most connected to social action and the promotion of wellbeing are to contribute to our betterment in the future, they need to change. Disruptive design for programs, services and the ways we fund such things is what is necessary if these fields are to have benefit beyond themselves. Long past are the days when doing good was something that belonged to those with a title (e.g., doctor, health promoter, social worker) or that what we called ourselves (e.g., teacher) meant we did something else unequivocally (e.g., educate). Now we are all teachers, all health promoters, all designers, and all entrepreneurs if we want to be. Some will be better than others and some will be more effective than others, but by disrupting these ideas we can design a better future.

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Asking if Technology Can Reinvent Education is the Wrong Question

Technology may aid in our strategy development, implementation of certain tactics for teaching, but it will not provide the grist for improving the social component of learning. Just as Facebook friends are (mostly) extensions of the friendships we create in everyday life without technology, so is learning. Technology is an aid, not the purpose and thus, focusing on the aids as the means for reinvention sidesteps whether we’re educating effectively in the first place and risks us doing what Russell Ackoff calls doing the wrongs righter.

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Science of Team Science 2

The second day of the Science of Team science conference wrapped up. This post muses aloud about why team science might be here to stay and how it may serve as the ideal response to practicing research on wicked problems in a complex world.

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Jaron Lanier and Dominant Design

Are we creating path dependencies with our creative technologies that actually limit creativity? Jaron Lanier thinks so and in this post I introduce the concept of dominant design and what it means in terms of technological and social innovation.

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Benchmarking Success in Times of Change

Beyond Google Wave, the metaphor of waves sloshing around in a sea of influence provides a useful metaphor for those interested in doing evaluation in an eHealth environment where there is no one cause and many consequences.

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Amazing Stuff: November 14th Edition

What we eat, how we produce the food we eat, whether our healthcare is environmentally sustainable, and how mobile technologies can help connect teens to health and filmmakers to audiences is all part of this week’s edition of Amazing Stuff.

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