Monthly Archives: February 2010

Indispensibility and Organizational Change

Seth Godin‘s recent book throws out the challenge to its readers to be indispensable in the jobs that they do. This is a tall order for most, but Godin points to ways of thinking, approaching problems and examples of how even the most mundane, mechanical jobs can be more when we bring the best of […]

Read More

Creating Sticky Networks

It seems that the recipe for creating networks that reduce social inequalities may also be the one that helps create ‘stickier’, more robust knowledge translation networks as well.

Read More

Innovation & Education: Solutions?

  The last couple of days I’ve been posting on issues of discovery and innovation and its ties to higher education pointing to a lot of the problems associated with the way that the scientific enterprise has been organized. These are complex problems because there is no one solution to them and no single cause. […]

Read More

Innovation and (Higher) Education

  In my last post I wrote about the problems facing scientific discovery and how our system of research funding and support is stifling opportunities for young innovators. I’d like to expand on that by focusing on the larger system that this research is couched in, particularly the way in which education is tied to […]

Read More

Scientific Discovery, Innovation, Creativity and How We’re Killing It

The structure of research funding and lack of support for young scientists is killing off opportunities to attract the best and brightest into the field and promote innovation. The reasons innovation is in trouble and science is becoming a hazardous career choice is explored.

Read More

Thinking: Why the Word Matters to Systems and Design

Thinking is a worthwhile term connected to ‘systems’ and ‘design’. New ways of visioning the systems we live in and how they are designed requires new ways of thinking and while it seemed funny at first, the use of the term ‘thinking’ seems more appropriate than ever to fit to both design and systems.

Read More

Social Innovation: Lessons from the Wizard of Oz

The remarkable story of the Wizard of Oz (and Star Wars) provide interesting parallels for those trying to understand the role of the social innovator, the challenges they face, and the opportunities that they create.

Read More

Social (non) Sense-making

What is true in the world of social media and decision making is a matter of interpretation. However that interpretation, often off-loaded to others in crowdsourcing models, might not work well when strong ties are needed to foster quality decisions.

Read More

Social Sense-making

We learn more from teaching than being taught and from interacting than working alone. So why are our sense-making approaches always posed towards individual learning? This post argues for the need to bring the social back into play.

Read More